THE ART OF MOROCCAN CUISINE/RICH CULTURE AND INTERNATIONAL FOOD that you must try

THE ART OF MOROCCAN CUISINE/RICH CULTURE AND INTERNATIONAL FOOD  that you must try

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Morocco, is known for its breathtaking scenery, for its gastronomy to fall to the ground, for the warmth welcoming and friendliness of its inhabitants but especially for .. its families.

Family is one of the most important elements of everyday’s life in Morocco. The Moroccan family is a living family, who spend a lot of time together, especially around good meals. Most interaction in the house took place at dinner, when everybody would gather around a great meal cooked by the mother of the house.

You first have to know that in Morocco, eating with your hands is a time-honoured tradition. Rule number one: eat with your right hand only, using the thumb and first two fingers. Using more is a sign of gluttony.

Lunch is the main meal in Moroccan. Most families eat the midday meal at home together before going back to work. The meal starts with green vegetables or salads called tapas, which are followed by tajine, a stew or soup. Hard-boiled eggs, bread, lamb or chicken and couscous are common parts of a Moroccan lunch as well.
Moroccan cuisine is considered one of the most important cuisines in the world. One of the reasons for its importance is its remarkable diversity of influences. In Moroccan dishes, one can trace the country’s long history of colonizers and immigrants who have left their mark in more than one way. The cuisine of the first inhabitants, the Berbers, still exists today in the staple dishes like tagine and couscous. The Arab invasion brought new spices, nuts and dried fruits, and the sweet and sour combinations that we see in dishes like tagine with dates and lamb. The Moors introduced olives, olive juice and citrus while the Jewish-Moors left behind their sophisticated preserving techniques that we see in the frequent use of preserved lemons, pickles, etc. The Ottoman Empire introduced barbeque (kebabs) to Moroccan cuisine. The French colony, although short-lived compared to reign of some of these other empires, left behind a culture of cafes, pastries, and even wine. Over time, cooks in the kitchens of the four royal cities (Fez, Marrakesh, Meknes, and Rabat) have developed and perfected the dishes that blend each of these distinct tastes. Every Moroccan dish has its place in society and varies with the market, the season, and the region.